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Feb. 13th, 2007 @ 08:37 pm Winter blues...
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From:am0
Date:February 16th, 2007 01:07 am (UTC)

Ubuntu

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Microsoft tries to make many things easy for you, such as getting trapped in an endless succession of upgrades just to keep your system functioning when they tweak some of their core systems like IE, .NET and Office. They also try hard to make other things impossible for you, such as a permanent configuration for your own system. They mostly succeed with these attempts.

Current Linux systems are competing with each other on ease of updating / upgrading. Ubuntu / Kubuntu / Xubuntu are all flavors of Debian; Fedora is an offshoot of Red Hat; SuSe was a German product; Mandrake / Mandriva comes from France (and is losing ground rapidly because of their basic misunderstanding of Linux customers) ... and there are hundreds of other distributions. But these are the current leaders, roughly in order of popularity. Whoever comes out on top, the users are the winners.
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From:grioghair
Date:January 9th, 2008 01:24 am (UTC)

Re: Ubuntu

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I am currently dabbling with Sabayon. I am considering using 64bit OSs. What is the software situation like in 64bit Linux?
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From:am0
Date:January 9th, 2008 03:08 am (UTC)

Re: Ubuntu

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I have no direct experience with 64-bit systems, but several people in my user group, KPLUG, have mentioned that operating systems for 64-bit systems generally don't run as well on those systems as the same software written or compiled for 32-bit systems. I've heard nothing concerning Sabayon.
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From:grioghair
Date:February 26th, 2008 11:13 pm (UTC)

Re: Ubuntu

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I still think that Sabayon is a damn good system, but it is bleeding edge. I am beginning to learn that the phrase "bleeding edge" is synonomous with buggy and unstable. The latest innovations at a price. Better than Windows? Definitely. But its grub has a problem recognising sata drives. I would have kept it installed but for that. Anyway, it is either a sata or a vista bootloader conflict - I am veering towards the former. Several other Linux systems seem to have this sata problem at the moment. There are other bleeding edge distros, one is called Sidux. It is a German-made distro, made from Debian unstable. It appears to work extremely well, though. I've not installed it as of yet, though.

Regarding Debian, what would your opinion be? I am looking for a solid distro, but I want to be free to compile software if I choose to. Doesn't Debian throw out software that does not fit their company policy of what Deb software should be?

Thanks,

G.
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From:am0
Date:February 27th, 2008 01:49 am (UTC)

Re: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu is Debian with the addition of software that doesn't meet the Debian organization's strict guidelines for software being open source and licensed according to particular licenses.

Try Wubi. It's a Ubuntu distribution for Windows systems. It may still be in alpha or early beta but they have an active team of developers. I wonder if Wubi would work with ReactOS ... .
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From:grioghair
Date:March 7th, 2008 02:15 am (UTC)

Re: Ubuntu

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Thank you very much for mentioning ReactOS. I had never heard of it before. Any thoughts of when it might come out of alpha?

I'm still dabbling with Linux and trying to find the best distro. You always get the same answer: "It depends what you want to do with it." What distro would you use - above all others? Actually, what Unix system would you use above all others? Debian?
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From:am0
Date:March 7th, 2008 05:52 am (UTC)

Re: Ubuntu

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I heard ReactOS might go from alpha to beta as early as April. If you have a spare system that has its display memory separate from the computer memory, you can play with a pretty workable system now. And they may have figured out a way around the memory problem by now, too. By the end of the year it should be a viable contender for the XP market.

Another system you might want to play around with, one that was in production before the company folded, is BeOS. I ran it for a while and it is a very powerful and elegant system with a small footprint (in other words, it doesn't use much memory) and there are programs available for it. It is strictly a toy, though, despite its power, because its third party vendor support has pretty much vanished.

The problems with Debian are their self-imposed restriction to only run programs with "free" licenses and their long release cycle. That is why Ubuntu -- Debian plus non-open-source software -- has become popular enough to foster spin-offs like Kubuntu, with the KDE desktop replacing Gnome. Most of the Linux people I know now are using Ubuntu ... or very quietly switching to OS X.

Regardless of your primary system, you should also have a Linux-based system on CD-ROM or flash drive, depending on what your hardware will boot to, for recovery and troubleshooting. Knoppix is the standard although I've also heard good things about Damn Small Linux in this regard.

If forced to go to a single Linux system I would choose Ubuntu. If forced to use only one system of any flavor, I'd have to go with OS X. But I like having multiple systems at my fingertips.